Summer reading

Best book ever

29601654The Summer That Melted Everything by debut author Tiffany McDaniel is my new Best book ever (for January anyway).

Some ‘Antarctic noir’ might have been a better choice while melting in Melbourne’s hot summer, but I couldn’t peel myself off the couch until I’d read the final page of this dark, gothic novel.

This book requires some willing suspension of disbelief, and I saw most of what was coming, but from a few pages in I was completely captivated by McDaniel’s stunning prose.

It’s a hell of a story (sorry, I couldn’t resist 🙂 )! It’s about what happens when prosecutor Autopsy Bliss (don’t be put off by the name like I was — that’s why it took me a while to get around to reading) invites the devil to the backwater town of Breathed, Ohio in the summer of 1984.

The Summer That Melted Everything is about family, redemption, love and evil. It made me cry, and at times I didn’t think I could bear the suffocating claustrophobia and aching sorrow — there’s not much bliss for the Bliss family that the story centres on. I’m not sure about the ending, and the book left me feeling shattered for sometime afterwards. Its images are still infiltrating my dreams.

Compelling, beautiful, brutal. If you’re looking for a cheery holiday read — this is not it.

Something old

xjane-eyre-popular-penguins-jpg-pagespeed-ic-lunfyo9spvJane Eyre | Charlotte Bronte

Jane Eyre is my current ‘bed book’. Unfortunately I often fall asleep and lose my page in my bed books. This one is so long — it’s going to take forever.

I avoided this classic when I was a teenager but felt compelled to give it a go after recently re-reading Wuthering Heights — which I adore — and was reluctant afterwards to leave the Bronte’s gothic 1800s world. Jane Eyre is quite different — obviously, I know; it’s not Emily — but I’m enjoying it. Slowly.

Something new

Confessions of a Mad Mooer: Postnatal Depression Sucks | Robin Elizabeth33152096

Confessions of a Mad Mooer was released at the end of last year. It’s a memoir about the author’s battle with PND and admission to a psychiatric hospital’s Mother and Baby Unit.

Confessions of a Mad Mooer is told with honesty and humour. The writing’s great, and it’s a compelling read about a widely misunderstood topic. Oh, and it also contains some hilarious parenting and cleaning tips!  

More info about Confessions of a Mad Mooer here

Something borrowed

1471987Tell Me I’m Here | Anne Deveson

Tell me I’m Here is Anne Deveson’s beautifully written, heartbreaking memoir about her son, Jonathan, who had schizophrenia. I borrowed it from my local library, and read up to the penultimate chapter. Jonathan’s death occurs in the next chapter — I read ahead to prepare myself, but still couldn’t continue.

While avoiding the last chapters, Anne Deveson and Georgia Blain (who I hadn’t realised was Anne’s daughter mentioned in the book) both passed away.

Tell Me I’m Here is still sitting on top of my TBR pile, with a book mark sticking out of the final pages. Now the library wants it back — I’ve already renewed it twice, so I can’t keep it any longer. Sadly, I don’t think I can finish.

Something blue

Mayan Mendacity by L.J.M Owen and The Light on the Water by Olga Lorenzo are on my TBR pile, but I haven’t started either yet. They both have beautiful blue covers.

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Mayan Mendacity | L.J.M Owen

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The Light on the Water | Olga Lorenzo

 

 

 

 

 

 

More of What I’m Reading can be found over on Meanjin’s blog.

What have you been reading this summer?

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4 thoughts on “Summer reading

  1. Paul Taylor VK3HN

    I’ve just read Day of the Triffids by Wyndham. I bought if for my son for Christmas as part of my ongoing program of indoctrinating him into the sci-fi canon. We’ve done Verne, Wells and Asimov, time to move more laterally. Isn’t that one of the more useful gifts a father can give his son, an appreciation of a literary genre, even if it is sci fi? Anyway, after checking an online summary I decided to read it first to check age appropriateness. It’s fine, but it gave me a nightmare one night when I read it for an hour just before bed. All those nasty triffids with their stingers swishing around in the garden, and the post-apocalyptic hopelessness of it all. I felt better the next morning when I remembered that the plants in my garden weren’t able to walk. Not a summery novel at all, other than triffids like sunshine. Clearly, I need to up my reading rate, I should try to get through a Harlan Ellison at least, before the chill sets in. 8^)

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  2. Tania Chandler Post author

    I wish my kids would read sci fi — or anything. Sadly, only one of my three love reading. I try to be a good role model — reading (and writing) a lot instead of doing anything much resembling housework. I’ve recently started a weekly family book group and I bribe them with junk food to come along.

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